Energy Commission Project Map and Project Equity Dashboard

The California Energy Commission‘s Interactive Project Map shows the location of projects funded by a range of programs, as well as the location of disadvantaged communities, low-income census tracts, and county boundaries. Additional data layers include Senate and Assembly districts. Data layers in the map can be turned on and off, and all information contained within the map is downloadable.

The California Energy Commission Project Equity Dashboard displays the sum of funding given through each program, and the distribution of funding across disadvantaged communities, low-income census tracts, both, or neither. Data shown in the dashboard can be filtered by county, Senate district, and Assembly district, displaying the sum and distribution of funding for particular regions of California, instead of for California as a whole.

Detailed descriptions of the data included in the map are listed below. The tool helps illustrate the work that the Energy Commission is doing. It is not meant to supplant official tracking of Energy Commission programs, nor does it include all programs run by the Energy Commission.

Energy Commission Project Map (opens new page)

Energy Commission Project Equity Dashboard

Data Layer Descriptions

California Clean Energy Jobs Act (Prop 39 K-12 Program), from program start in 2013 to program end in 2018:

  • Program Information: http://www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/proposition39/

  • California Clean Energy Jobs Act (Prop 39) K-12 Program helps schools improve energy efficiency and expand clean energy generations. The program, administered by the Energy Commission in coordination with the California Department of Education, allocated $1.748 billion from 2013 to 2018 to K-12 schools.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Site Name: The name of the site where the energy efficiency measures are installed. A local educational agency may have several site names within one grant.
    • Grant Recipient’s Address
    • Prop 39 K-12 Program Approved Funding Amount
    • Estimated Annual Electric Savings by Site (kilowatt-hours [kWh]): Estimated annual electric savings after measures have been installed at the site.
    • Estimated Annual Energy Cost Savings by Site ($): The annual cost savings for the site when the project is complete—in some cases, the number is negative as the school switched from natural gas to electricity, bringing up electricity costs but lowering natural gas costs.
    • Project Status: "Completed" signifies that the measures have been installed and the final report (which includes 12 months of postcompletion benchmarking data) has been submitted and approved. “In Progress" signifies that the project is still underway with reports and benchmarking still required.

Geothermal Grant and Loan Program (GRDA), starting from 2010 to present:

  • Program Information: http://www.energy.ca.gov/geothermal/grda.html

  • Commonly known as the GRDA Program because of its funding source, the Geothermal Grant and Loan Program uses 30% of the State’s Geothermal Resources Development Account to promote the development of new or existing geothermal resources and technologies. The Energy Commission makes GRDA Program awards through competitive solicitations, available for a wide variety of geothermal-related projects, including geothermal technology research, research assessment, exploration and development, local and regional planning, impact mitigation projects, and mineral recovery from geothermal brines.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Grant Recipient: Energy Commission selected awardee for grant funding. Funding requirements include that the grant projects be located in California. Grant recipients must be registered and in good standing with the California Secretary of State.
    • Recipient Address: Recipient address does not always provide an accurate view of where grant projects are located as it may not be the actual site location.
    • Grant #: This is an Energy Commission identifier given to all grant projects. The middle 2 numbers identify the year that the funding was awarded. (example: GEO-16-006 funds were awarded in 2016)
    • Funds Awarded: Total grant award amount by the Energy Commission.
    • Funds Paid: This column shows Energy Commission funds invoiced for and paid by the Energy Commission. This field is left blank for active grants.
    • Match Funds Committed: Match funds are funds committed to the project on behalf of the grantee.
    • Match Funds Provided: This column shows Energy Commission funds invoiced for and paid by the Energy Commission. This field is left blank for active grants.
    • Project Status: Shows if an agreement is Active, Complete, or Terminated. Active- An agreement which is currently underway. Complete- An agreement that has completed all of the deliverables specified in the agreement. Terminated- An agreement that ended before completing all of the deliverables specified in the agreement, and prior to receiving the full funding amount.
    • Project Coordinates: GPS coordinates provided in degrees, minutes, and seconds (DMS). Some projects do not have one specific physical location. In those instances, general locations have been provided. (example: GEO-16-003 involved satellite imagery of a broad area. These coordinates represent the site location of the project.

Local Government Challenges Grant (LGCG), from program start in 2017 to present:

  • Program Information: http://www.energy.ca.gov/contracts/GFO-16-404/

  • The Local Government Challenge is a partnership between the Energy Commission and local governments to support the development of innovative solutions to improve energy performance in communities. In 2017, the Energy Commission awarded 13 grants to local governments in one of two categories totaling $10.2 million. The Small Government Leadership Challenge grants work to aid smaller governments in designing and implementing climate action plans or other planning efforts advancing greenhouse gas reductions. The Energy Innovation Challenge encourages participation of local governments that have already set climate and energy goals and are looking to carry out innovative efficiency deployment projects.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Grant Recipient: Recipients include local governments, such as the city or county government, or organizations connected to city or county governments, such as joint power authorities, councils of governments, and housing authorities.
    • Grant Recipient’s Address
    • Project Summary
    • Approved Grant Amount

Energy Conservation Assistance Act (ECAA), starting from 2009 to present:

  • Program Information: http://www.energy.ca.gov/efficiency/financing/calmap/county/

  • The ECAA program provides low- and no-interest loans and technical support to cities, counties, special districts, public schools, and colleges to implement energy efficiency projects. The program began in 1979, but the map includes ECAA project data since 2009. Historical information can be found here.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Loan Recipient: Loan recipients are public entities such as school districts, charter schools, county offices of education, state special schools, community college districts, cities, counties, special districts, public colleges or universities, public care institutions/public hospitals, University of California campuses, or California State Universities.
    • Loan Recipient’s Address
    • Project Summary
    • Approved Loan Amount
    • Estimated Annual Energy Cost Savings: The estimated annual dollar savings gained due to the energy efficiency projects.
    • Estimated Annual Electricity Savings (kWh): The estimated annual electricity (kWh) savings gained due to the energy efficiency projects.
    • Estimated Annual Natural Gas Savings: The estimated annual gas (therms) savings gained due to the energy efficiency projects.

New Solar Homes Partnership Program (NSHP), from program start in 2007 to program end in 2018:

  • Program Information: https://www.newsolarhomes.org/WebPages/Public/Login.aspx

  • As a part of the California Solar Initiative, the program provides financial incentives and other support to homebuilders to encourage the installation of eligible solar energy systems on new residential construction, with special attention paid to affordable housing issues. The program, which ended June 1, 2018, is not accepting any applications.

  • To protect the anonymity of program participants, data regarding NSHP have been tallied up to the county, Senate district, and Assembly district levels, showing the total number of projects, sum of rebate dollars given, and overall system capacity installed per each county, Senate district, and Assembly district. To view NSHP data, click on a county, Senate district, or Assembly district—NSHP totals are displayed in the pop-up box.

Operational Power Plants Permitted by Energy Commission

  • The Energy Commission ensures thermal power plants 50 megawatts (MW) or greater are certified safely and expeditiously. It also ensures power plants comply with all applicable environmental laws and regulations and impacts to public health, safety, or the environment are mitigated with feasible measures to a level of less than significant. In 2017, the Energy Commission oversaw environmental and regulatory compliance for about 100 power plants, which includes 29,600 MW of power at 84 natural gas-fired plants, 1,445 MW at four solar power projects, and more than 1,000 MW at 11 geothermal power plants.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Plant ID: The CEC GIS Unit assigns this code of identification when the power plant is first reported on Form CEC-1304 schedules or proposed on CEC Siting project or reported as operational on REAT project. The first letter of the code is based on the general fuel type. C = Coal. E = Biomass, Digester Gas, Landfill Gas, MSW. G = Gas. H = Hydro. S = Solar. T = Geothermal. W = Wind. The four-digit number is assigned by next increment number by each fuel type. This field is unique and should not reuse any ID.
    • Plant Name
    • MW: The generation capacity of the power plant or combination of generator capacity the power plant, as built
    • Gross MWh: The total amount of electric energy produced by the power plant, measured in megawatt-hours (MWh)
    • Net MWh: The amount of gross generation minus the electrical energy consumed at the generating station(s) for station service or auxiliaries
    • General Fuel: Power Plant Fuel Type. General energy fuel types: Biomass, Coal, Digester Gas, Gas, Geothermal, Hydro, Landfill Gas, MSW, Nuclear, Solar (PV), Solar Thermal, Wind, and Other.
    • Status: Current Operational Status of the power plant. Power plant generation status identifiers: Cold Standby, Indefinite Shutdown, Maintenance, Non-Operational, Operating, Proposed, Retired, Standby, Terminated, and Unknown.
    • STEP License Status: Status of an Energy Commission jurisdictional power plant in the Energy Commission licensing process
    • Operation Jobs: Number of jobs created by power plant operations
    • Property Tax: Annual dollar value of property taxes paid by power plant owner
    • Sales Tax: Total dollar value of sales tax generated by power plant
    • Capacity Factor: Energy generated by a power plant divided by the energy that could have been generated had it operated at full output for the entire year.

All Operational Power Plants Larger Than 50 MW

This set includes both power plants permitted by the Energy Commission and any additional power plants across the state not permitted by the Energy Commission that can produce more than 50 MWs. The data contained within the set are the same as the set of CEC Permitted Plants.

Alternative and Renewable Fuel and Vehicle Technology Program (ARFVTP), from program start in 2007 to present:

  • Program Information: http://www.energy.ca.gov/altfuels/

  • The ARFVTP promotes the development and deployment of advanced transportation and fuel technology. The program has invested in a broad portfolio of projects, including electric vehicle charging infrastructure, hydrogen refueling infrastructure, and medium- and heavy-duty vehicles powered by low- or zero-emission fuels. The ARFVTP has also invested in alternative fuel production and workforce development.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Agreement Number: A unique identification number referring to a funding agreement between the Energy Commission and another party.
    • Project Number: Project number within a given agreement. An agreement may have multiple project locations. Each project typically has only one location or else is considered statewide.
    • Recipient/Contractor: The name of the entity receiving ARFVTP funding to implement an agreement.
    • Project Title: Name of a project, if applicable.
    • Project Amount: Amount of ARFVTP funding provided to a project within the recipient’s broader agreement. For agreements with multiple project sites, this may be an estimate.
    • Project Type: Categorization of the fuel type, supply chain, and/or overall nature of a project.
    • Status: Shows if an agreement is pending, active, or completed. Pending: An agreement that has not been officially executed yet but has been approved at an Energy Commission business meeting. Active: An agreement which is underway. Completed: An agreement that has completed all of the deliverables specified in the agreement.
    • Address: Location of the project site, not necessarily the funding recipient’s administrative office. Not for use as a source for public refueling station availability. To find alternative fuel refueling stations, please visit https://www.afdc.energy.gov/.

Electric Program Investment Charge (EPIC), from program start in 2013 to present

  • Program Information: http://www.energy.ca.gov/research/epic/

  • The EPIC program invests more than $160 million annually on research to transform the state’s energy system to meet the demands of the 21st century and to improve the resiliency of the electric system to the impacts of climate change. The Energy Commission is one of four administrators for the program, along with the three major electric investor owned utilities (Pacific Gas and Electric Company [PG&E], Southern California Edison [SCE], and San Diego Gas & Electric Company [SDG&E]) and invests about $130 million per year. In December 2016, the Energy Commission adopted a target for 25 percent of EPIC funding for demonstration projects to be allocated to projects sited in disadvantaged communities. In October 2017, Assembly Bill 523 (Reyes, Chapter 551) added the requirement that 10 percent of EPIC funds for demonstration projects also be allocated to projects located in and benefitting low-income communities.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Agreement Number: A unique identification number referring to a funding agreement between the Energy Commission and another party.
    • Recipient/Contractor: The name of the entity receiving EPIC funding to implement an agreement.
    • Project Title: Name of a project, if applicable.
    • Project Amount: Amount of EPIC funding provided to a project within the recipient’s broader agreement. For agreements with multiple project sites, this may be an estimate.
    • Category: Categorization of project.
    • Address: Location of the project site; not necessarily the funding recipient’s administrative office.
    • Address Type: States whether the address represents the site of the project (S) or the address of the grant recipient (HQ)
    • Project Link: A link to a more detailed description of the project

Public Interest Energy Research – Natural Gas (PIER-NG), from 2013 to present

  • The PIER-NG program focuses on identifying and addressing emerging natural gas-related trends that are important to California’s energy future.

  • The additional data included in the map is as follows:
    • Agreement Number: A unique identification number referring to a funding agreement between the Energy Commission and another party.
    • Recipient/Contractor: The name of the entity receiving PIER-NG funding to implement an agreement.
    • Project Title: Name of a project (if applicable).
    • Project Amount: Amount of PIER-NG funding provided to a project (within the recipient’s broader agreement). For agreements with multiple project sites, this may be an estimate.
    • Category: Categorization of project.
    • Address: Location of the project site; not necessarily the funding recipient’s administrative office.
    • Address Type: States whether the address represents the site of the project (S) or the address of the grant recipient (HQ)
    • Project Link: A link to a more detailed description of the project

For more information, please contact:

Fritz Foo
916-657-1626
Fritz.Foo@energy.ca.gov

Travis David
916-651-0592
travis.david@energy.ca.gov